As students progress through the Lower School, cross-discipline activities deepen understanding by providing hands-on experiences to explore topics ranging from American expansion, immigration and ancient cultures to literature and increasingly complex math concepts. Students look forward to their turn to participate in these events as milestones which signify growth, maturity, and progression through Grace Church School. 


List of 10 items.

  • Math Graph Breakfast

    Grade 1 students host the Math Graph breakfast where they teach their parents how to use and read graphs.
  • International Games Breakfast

    Grade 1 students teach their parents various games from around the world.
  • Lewis and Clark Museum

    At the culmination of the Second Grade's simulation of Lewis and Clark's extraordinary journey across the United States, the students, their homeroom teachers, along with their art teacher, present their accumulated projects for the museum.  The work is vast and usually includes, sculptures (large and small) of animals and birds of prey, replicas of farms, Native American villages, and houses of that time period.  The student's journals written in either the voice of Lewis or Clark are also on display.  
  • Publishing Party

    Second grade students spend several months writing, editing, and putting into "publishing format," a Tall Tale that they created, using the style of famous Tall Tales that they have read during the year.  Parents are invited into the school library to listen and see for the first time, their child's finished, "published" story.
  • Mock Ellis Island

    At the culmination of the Third Grade's study of the 1900's influx of immigrants, the third graders take on the identity of "an immigrant," study the reasons for the immigrants desire to come to America, and then, present himself/herself to the the Immigration authorities at Ellis Island.  Parents are asked to "act" the role of a particular authority (i.e. nurse, doctor, documents inspector.) The Dining Room is made to look like an official Ellis Island room, and the participants are dressed in period attire.
  • New York Stories (3rd Grade play)

    This play was written by a third grade teacher to reflect the year-long study of the The Peopling of New York City.  The play is a reflection of the carefully integrated curriculum, created by the third grade head teachers and the members of the arts department.  The show is presented in early June.
  • Japanese Children's Society

    The Fourth Graders, get to experience the very beginning stages of our Foreign Exchange Program, when they become young diplomats, representing our school in the Autumn, during a yearly visit to this Japanese School, located in northern New Jersey.  We do a reciprocal host/guest international exchange in February, when our Exchange Program school, comes to visit us. When the Japanese students visit us, we put the children in age appropriate classrooms, which allows for other divisions and grades the opportunity to host our "foreign" guests. Each of the visits helps to build a finer understanding and appreciation of another culture.  The visits are filled with assemblies, classroom visits, and fun-filled, hands-on projects, as well as the traditional exchange of gifts.  Each school provides a traditional national lunch during the exchange.
  • Mythical Musical (4th Grade play)

    Performed in February, this play reflects the student's study of ancient Greek civilization.  The play displays the careful use of integrating our social studies program with our arts department.
  • Athens/Sparta Debate

    The Athens - Sparta Debate is the culmination of the students' research on a specific topic either from the Athenian or Spartan perspective.  The great debate, as to which society will win, is determined by an actual judge.  The students come to the debate, not only academically well prepared, but with seriousness of purpose.  
     
  • Roman Forum

    The Roman Forum takes place in June, at the end of the grades formal study of ancient Rome.  The students spend several weeks with a group of fellow fourth graders, studying a particular aspect of Ancient Roman life. The students must write an essay describing their field of study and then build a replica to reflect their assigned task (famous buildings, farms, homes of the poor and rich, schools, and exploding Mt. Vesuvius, etc).